Lollards

or, Some account of the witnesses for the truth in Great Britain from A. D. 1400 to A. D. 1546. With a brief notice of events connected with the early history of the Reformation.
  • 360 Pages
  • 3.94 MB
  • 4740 Downloads
  • English
by
Religious Tract Society , London
Lollards., Reformation -- Biography., Reformation -- Eng

Places

Eng

ContributionsReligious Tract Society (Great Britain)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBR378 .S78 1880, Microfilm 28493 BR
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 360 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5132818M
LC Control Number74261690

This book is a good look at the Lollards and their place in history. The concise work (about pages long) covers Lollard history from John Wycliffe's time at Oxford to the coming of the Protestant reformation.

It does a good job of examining Wycliffe, those who protected him, and what exactly his ideas were/5(3). These two classes met in her first book, ’s Saving Gideon. Brought up in Mississippi, she now lives with her better half and child in Oklahoma. Amy Lillard is a great author with a great sense of direction.

She has written several books that is woth reading. Amy is. This book is a good look at the Lollards and their place in history. The concise work (about pages long) covers Lollard history from John Wycliffe's time at Oxford to the coming of the Protestant reformation.

It does a good job of examining Wycliffe, those /5(3). The Lollards offers a brief, insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement.

Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology of an Oxford professor, John Wyclif, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the3/5. John Wycliffe (/ ˈ w ɪ k l ɪ f /; also spelled Wyclif, Wycliff, Wiclef, Wicliffe, Wickliffe; c.

s – 31 December ) was an English scholastic philosopher, theologian, biblical translator, reformer, priest, and a seminary professor at the University of became an influential dissident within the Roman Catholic priesthood during the 14th century and is considered an important Alma mater: Merton College, Oxford.

Lollards and Protestants in the Diocese of York, [Arthur Geoffrey Dickens] Book: All Authors / Contributors: Arthur Geoffrey Dickens. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: The Actes and Monuments, popularly known as Foxe's Book of Martyrs, is a work of Protestant history and martyrology by Protestant English historian John Foxe, first published in by John includes a polemical account of the sufferings of Protestants under the Catholic Church, with particular emphasis on England and book was highly influential in those countries and Author: John Foxe.

The Lollards who followed Wyclif derived their name from the medieval Dutch words meaning 'to mutter' (probably reflecting their style of worship, which was based on.

The burning of John Badby from Book of Martyrs () John F. Harrison, the author of The Common People () has pointed out that "John Badby was one Lollards book the earliest of a succession of Lollard martyrs memorialized for later generations of humble readers in the gruesome illustrations to Foxe's Book of Martyrs.

It is clear from John Foxe's. Lollard sermons. [Gloria Cigman;] Print book: EnglishView all editions and formats: Summary: The nature of the Lollards and their beliefs are evident in these sermons, composed for popular transmission and as a manual for the preacher.

Lollards book They range in subject from gospel sermons. The Lollards The Lollards were followers of Wycliffe, at first composed of Wycliffe's supporters at Oxford and the royal court, but soon the movement spread and became a strong popular movement.

It was blamed (perhaps unfairly) for some of the anticlerical aspects of the Peasant's Revolt. Lollardy has been called 'England's first heresy'. It was never an organized movement in the sense of a modern religious or secular organization.

There was no 'Head Lollard' or organizational hierarchy of Lollards. Rather, Lollards were simply people tied together by a set of beliefs. Those beliefs. Lollards participants in a 14th-century peasant-plebeian movement in England and in certain other Western European countries as well; the movement took on the character of an anti-Catholic heresy.

The Lollards first appeared in Antwerp around They emerged in England in the early ’s (the preaching of J. Ball), although the term “Lollards. The movement led by Wycliffe was known as the “Lollards,” a pejorative term derived from the Latin lolium, which meant “a wild weed or vetch (often translated as ‘tares’) which can choke out wheat, as in the parable from Matthew ”(The Lollard Society) “Another parable put he forth unto them, saying, The kingdom of heaven is likened unto a man which sowed good seed in his.

Lollards and their Books book.

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Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The history of the Lollard movement is intimately concerned with /5(5). Mere Christianity - and Facing a hard future of the Faith. (See Pilgrim Church book) We are going to keep this site as simple as possible; the term Lollard was the term used to describe the simple Christians that sought to follow New Testament teachings and practiced the priesthood of all believers (that we are all priests with the world as.

The essays in this book reveal their broader implications for the study of English literature and history through a series of closely focused studies that demonstrate the wide-ranging influence of Lollard writings and ideas on later medieval English culture. The Lollards offers a brief, insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement.

Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology of an Oxford professor, John Wyclif, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the sixteenth century.

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The Lollards offers a brief but insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement. Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology of the Oxford professor, John Wyclif, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the sixteenth century.

The Lollard Movement. At Oxford University, Wycliffe's radical views attracted many followers. Within a few years after Wycliffe's death, these followers picked up the derogatory nickname 'Lollards.'. Sven Fristedt, The Wycliff Bible Stockholm 53C.

Lindberg StN 42 70 Mss & versions of Wycliffite bibleAnne Hudson MAE 40 71 A Lollard Sermon CycleAnne Hudson RES 22 71 A Lollard Quire [with knight & clerk discussing q.

of Lordship]Peggy Ann Knapp Spec. 46 71 Wycliff as bible translatorAnne Hudson NQ 20 73 Contrib. to a bibliog. of Wycliffite writings. LOLLARDS. Lollards is the name given to the English followers of John wyclif, the Oxford theologian and heretic who died in A derogatory term, it was meant to convey the attributes of a lollaerd (in Middle Dutch, a mumbler) and a loller (in Middle English, an idler).

At first the sect was confined to a small group of educated priests, such as Nicholas hereford, Philip repington, and John. The history of the Lollard movement is intimately concerned with their writings and literacy.

Description Lollards EPUB

Anne Hudson's work in this field is the most important modern contribution to the subject. This collection of articles makes indispensable reading for anyone interested in the history or the Price: $ The Twelve Conclusions of the Lollards is a Middle English religious text document containing statements by followers of the English medieval sect, the Lollards, followers of John Wycliffe.

[1] The Conclusions were written in [2] The text document was presented to the Parliament of England and nailed to the doors of Westminster Abbey and St Paul's Cathedral as a placard (usual medieval.

General Overviews. The studies listed here provide a starting point for further work. Hudson provides a comprehensive overview of all the sources for the study of lollardy.

Catto surveys the early development of the movement at Oxford. Ghosh analyzes Wyclif’s and Wycliffite biblical interpretation. McSheffrey considers what trial records can reveal about the religious.

Question: "Who were the Lollards?" Answer: The term Lollard is a pejorative from the Middle Dutch lollaert, which meant “mumbler.”The term was used to refer to someone who had pious but heretical beliefs. It came to be applied to the followers of John Wycliffe (–).

Wycliffe was an Oxford theologian who questioned the authority of the Pope and emphasized the authority of Scripture. ‘Although the book spans a period from the Lollards to New Labour, Rose primarily examines the autodidact tradition from around the time of the Reform Bill up to the end of the Second World War.’ ‘An enormously bloated religious class straddles society, attempting.

The Significance of the Lollard Bible. well printed and possibly on India paper, are insensibly deluded into thinking it a shorter book than, in fact, it is. A Latin Vulgate written on vellum in Wycliffe’s day would normally make two large folio volumes.

This is the version the Lollards used when they had been driven from Oxford out. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Evangelical Doctor: John Wycliffe and the Lollards by Douglas C.

Wood (, Paperback) at. The Lollards and Wyclif denied many of the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church which undermined the authority of the Scriptures and the gospel of Christ and his twelve Apostles. For the first time in English history, an appeal was made “to the people, not the scholars.”.

Lollards synonyms, Lollards pronunciation, Lollards translation, English dictionary definition of Lollards. An English reforming sect following the teachings of John Wycliffe. Lollards - definition of Lollards by The Free Dictionary.

Then wherefore would you have me view that book? The Lollards offers a brief but insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement. Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology of the Oxford professor, John Wyclif, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the sixteenth : Macmillan Education UK.The Lollards offers a brief but insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement.

Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology of the.